What are you doing in my house

It seems to me that classical music, at least in America, is rather unpopular and dismissed as boring old museum pieces, particularly 20th century music, the whipping boy of classical music. Lately I’ve been listening to a lot of Webern and the emotional significance his music carries, at least for me, is strong enough that I feel the need to expose it to others. I’ve often heard the complaint that “dissonant”, or “modern”, or “avant-garde” music isn’t really music because it isn’t realistically applicable, because it’s all just music theory, pointless experimentation, etc. and, indeed, some of it is, just as there is good and bad art in anything. But, unlike “experimental” art, where the artist creates something without an intentional vision, Webern clearly understood what he was doing—and the fractured, abstract sounds of his music carries a lot of emotion and has touched me deeply. If there is any music that is “realistically applicable”, it’s Webern. Many people shy away from music that may be dissonant, dark, challenging, etc. but I think that it’s very important to develop that side of our mind, and shying away from it seems to be evidence that one has not had the chance to explore these negative emotions and see the beauty in them. Some people listen to pop music because that is how they want to feel, but Webern shows us what we actually feel.

"The 15th of September 1945, the day of Anton Webern’s death, should be a day of mourning for any receptive musician. Doomed to a total failure in a deaf world of ignorance and indifference he inexorably kept on cutting out his diamonds, his dazzling diamonds, the mines of which he had such a perfect knowledge." —Igor Stravinsky 

maxpitchkites:

I have begun to learn oil painting, and it is not easy. Here is a palette knife painting.
Painting of a shot from The Weeping Meadow, directed by Theo Angelopoulos

maxpitchkites:

I have begun to learn oil painting, and it is not easy. Here is a palette knife painting.

Painting of a shot from The Weeping Meadow, directed by Theo Angelopoulos

“Until you make the unconscious conscious, it will direct your life and you will call it fate.”
Carl Gustav Jung (via globalawakening)
“In all chaos there is a cosmos, in all disorder a secret order.”
— Carl Jung (via kushandwizdom)
magictransistor:

Carl Jung. Liber Novus, Red Book. 1914-1930. 

magictransistor:

Carl Jung. Liber Novus, Red Book. 1914-1930. 

“People will do anything, no matter how absurd, to avoid facing their own souls.”
— Carl Jung (via henretta84)
“The meeting of two personalities is like the contact of two chemical substances: if there is any reaction, both are transformed.”
— Carl Jung (via wofew)